The role of non-ionizing electromagnetic radiation on female fertility: A review

Safer Technology Aotearoa New Zealand

April 3, 2022

ABSTRACT

With increasing technological developments, exposure to non-ionizing radiations has become unavoidable as people cannot escape from electromagnetic field sources, such as Wi-Fi, electric wires, microwave oven, radio, telecommunication, bluetooth devices, etc.

These radiations can be associated with increased health problems of the users. This review aims to determine the effects of non-ionizing electromagnetic radiations on female fertility. To date, several in vitro and in vivo studies unveiled that exposure to non-ionizing radiations brings about harmful effects on oocytes, ovarian follicles, endometrial tissue, estrous cycle, reproductive endocrine hormones, developing embryo, and fetal development in animal models. Non-ionizing radiation also upsurges the free radical load in the uterus and ovary, which leads to inhibition of cell growth and DNA disruptions.

In conclusion, non-ionizing electromagnetic radiations can cause alterations in both germ cells as well as in their nourishing environment and also affect other female reproductive parameters that might lead to infertility.

Full Article:

https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/09603123.2022.2030676

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